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Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of West Germanic inflection, derivation and compounding found in the catalog.

West Germanic inflection, derivation and compounding

Joseph B. Voyles

West Germanic inflection, derivation and compounding

by Joseph B. Voyles

  • 108 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by Mouton in The Hague .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Germanic languages -- Word formation.,
  • Proto-Germanic language.,
  • German language -- Old High German, 750-1050 -- Word formation.,
  • English language -- Old English, ca. 450-1100 -- Word formation.,
  • Old Saxon language -- Word formation.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Joseph B. Voyles.
    SeriesJanua linguarum. Series practica,, 145
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPD175 .V6 1974
    The Physical Object
    Pagination204 p.
    Number of Pages204
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5310389M
    LC Control Number72094456

    It's time to dive into derivation. Compounding. There are two major sub-fields of derivation; compounding and affixing. Compounding means putting whole words together to form a new word, as in the following examples: "roommate" (noun + noun) "bluebird" (adjective + noun) "babysit" (noun + verb). compounding in certain languages, it seems to be just one of several mor­ phological processes involved in word formation. Other such processes must be allowed to freely interact with inflection. One argument Lieber gives in support of her theory is that in German, inflection interacts with derivation and compounding.

    The paper presents an analysis of noun inflection in Modern Standard German within a process framework. Familiar issues in the description of German inflectional morphology are discussed, such as analysis of weak nouns and of plural formation, and the establishment of inflectional classes, as well as broader theoretical issues such as postulation of identity relations (“zeros”). The articles in this series define and exemplify the most common word formation processes, or the creation of new words, in English including derivation, back-formation, conversion, compounding, clipping, blending, abbreviations, acronyms, eponyms, coinages, nonce words, borrowing, and calquing.

    West Germanic languages, group of Germanic languages that developed in the region of the North Sea, Rhine-Weser, and Elbe. Out of the many local West Germanic dialects the following six modern standard languages have arisen: English, Frisian, Dutch (Netherlandic-Flemish), Afrikaans, German, and. This chapter deals with the evolution of preverbs and discusses the development of a telic function by directionals after a process of lexicalization and grammaticalization. The main language of analysis is Old English and the discussion includes a comparison with Sanskrit, Gothic and Old Icelandic. The theoretical background is provided by Role and Reference Grammar.


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West Germanic inflection, derivation and compounding by Joseph B. Voyles Download PDF EPUB FB2

: West Germanic Inflection, Derivation and Compounding (Janua Linguarum. Series Practica) (): Voyles, Joseph B.: BooksAuthor: Joseph B. Voyles. Architecture and Design Arts Asian and Pacific Studies Business and Economics Chemistry Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies Computer Sciences Cultural Studies Engineering General Interest Geosciences History Industrial Chemistry Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies Jewish Studies Law Library and Information Science, Book Studies Life Sciences Linguistics.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Voyles, Joseph B., West Germanic inflection, derivation and compounding. The Hague, Mouton, Get this from a library. West Germanic Inflection, Derivation and Compounding. [Joseph B Voyles].

West Germanic Inflecti My Searches (0) My Cart Added To Cart Check Out. Menu. Subjects. West Germanic Inflection, Derivation and Compounding.

Series:Janua Linguarum. Series Practica DE GRUYTER MOUTON Book Book Series. Overview. Details. x cm pages DE GRUYTER MOUTON Language: English. - This book contains an analysis of small portions of the grammars of Old High German, Old Saxon and Old English as these languages appear at their earliest attested stages.

On the basis of these grammars the author tries to reconstruct the grammar of the proto-language (West Germanic). This book is a description of the morphological system of Dutch in English.

Inflection, derivation, and compounding are each discussed in separate chapters, following a short exposé on the basic assumptions of morphological theory.

The traditional criterion of demarcation betwee n compounding and derivation is the following: (1) Compounding consists of the combination of two or more lexemes, whereas derivation is. In morphology, there is a functional distinction between inflection and derivation.

Inflection denotes the set of morphological processes that spell out the set of word forms of a lexeme. The traditional criterion of demarcation between compounding and derivation is the following: (1) Compounding consists of the combination of two or more lexemes, whereas derivation is characterized by the addition of an affix, that is, a bound morpheme, to a lexeme.

This chapter gives a thorough description of the facts of compounding in English, looking not only at those areas of full productivity that have been extensively studied, but also at some compound types which are less productive and less well covered in the literature.

It is organized as follows. Section gives an overview of the data, considering coordinate, subordinate, and attributive. The relation of compounding with derivation on the one hand and inflection on the other has been a challenging topic with consequences for the architecture of grammar.

In Chap. 11, it is proposed that there is no radical separation line between derivation and compounding, and thus, if derivation is to be treated within morphology, compounding.

Compounding and inflection in German child language. Authors; Authors and affiliations “Frequency, Markedness and Morphological Change: on Predicting the Spread of Noun-plural -s in Modern High German and West Germanic”.

ESCOL `90 Bartke S., Wiese R. () Compounding and inflection in German child language. In: Booij G., van Marle. This post will focus on derivation and compounding, i.e. the twin arts of creating new words on the basis of existing words.

We'll first look at derivation, which is not very productive in Moten, and for this reason shouldn't take too long to discuss, before turning to compounding, which is much more commonly used in the language.

Inflection and Derivation G Booij,VrijeUniversiteitAmsterdam,Amsterdam, TheNetherlands htsreserved. Introduction Inflection and derivation are traditional notions in the domain of morphology, the subdiscipline of lin-guistics that deals with the internal structure of words.

Inflection deals with the different forms of a word. The Oxford Handbook of Derivational Morphology is intended as a companion volume to the Oxford Handbook of Compounding (OUP ), aiming to provide a comprehensive and thorough overview of the study of derivational morphology.

Written by distinguished scholars, its 41 chapters are devoted to theoretical and definitional matters, formal and semantic issues, interdisciplinary connections, and. Derivation and inflection. Test yourself: Derivation and inflection. One of the key distinctions among morphemes is between derivational and inflectional morphemes.

Derivational morphemes make fundamental changes to the meaning of the stem whereas inflectional morphemes are used to mark grammatical information. Morphological derivation, in linguistics, is the process of forming a new word from an existing word, often by adding a prefix or suffix, such as un-or -ness.

For example, unhappy and happiness derive from the root word happy. It is differentiated from inflection, which is the modification of a word to form different grammatical categories without changing its core meaning: determines. Inflectional morphology is the study of processes, including affixation and vowel change, that distinguish word forms in certain grammatical categories.

Inflectional morphology differs from derivational morphology or word-formation in that inflection deals with changes made to existing words and derivation deals with the creation of new words. This article takes a quantitative approach to the long-term dynamics of the preterite inflection in West Germanic, with a special focus on Dutch.

In a first step, we replicate two often-cited studies on English and German (Lieberman et al. and Carroll et al.

respectively) by looking at Dutch. This part also tackles some methodological shortcomings in the previous studies. An inflection/derivation distinction on the other side of the globe?

Posted on by Martin Haspelmath There is a tradition of dividing all of (non-compounding) morphology into inflection and derivation in European languages, and like other European traditions, this one has been carried over to languages around the world.

The Oxford Handbook of Derivational Morphology is intended as a companion volume to The Oxford Handbook of Compounding (OUP ) Written by distinguished scholars, its 41 chapters aim to provide a comprehensive and thorough overview of the study of derivational morphology.

The handbook begins with an overview and a consideration of definitional matters, distinguishing derivation .Compounding is a linguistic phenomenon that might at first glance seem straightforward: in his introductory text Bauer ( 40) defines a compound as ‘the formation of a new lexeme by adjoining two or more lexemes’.But Marchand, in ‘Expansion, transposition, and derivation’ (), presents another view, in effect saying that compounds don't exist as a separate sort of word formation.